Lots of children start needing glasses from an early age, but unlike adults, kids can struggle a lot with this change in their lives. While most adults will take needing glasses in their stride, children will be more resistant.

Kids Need to Know About Wearing Glasses

If your little one has had a recent visit to the opticians where they found out they’ll need glasses, there are some key things you’ll need to teach them. Glasses can be a bit of a learning curve, but here are three key lessons every child needs to know.

Proper care and cleaning

If you’re going to spend your hard-earned money on Oakley prescription glasses from Frames Direct, you want to make sure your children know how to take care of them properly. Children have a habit of leaving their glasses where they can be stood or sat on, so teach them how to put their glasses away in their case before running off to play. Tell them that leaving their glasses on their heads or attached to their T-shirt are sure-fire ways to break the lenses and encourage them to keep their glasses on as much as possible. 

When glasses lenses become smudged, children should know how to clean them using a soft cloth rather than the sleeve of their jumper. This will help to prevent scratches and will allow your child to see clearly all day long.

Customization

Every child should know that glasses come in all kinds of colors, shapes, and sizes so they can choose the ones they like the best. While it can be tempting to pick out the frames that you like the best, it’s important to give your child control over the situation. After all, they’re going to be the ones wearing their new glasses, so why not let them choose bright pink or yellow? If your child doesn’t like how a certain pair of glasses feel, even if your optician recommended them, listen to their concerns and try to work around them. There are lots of opticians out there who can work with you and your child towards a solution.

Glasses don’t change who they are

Thanks to the media, many children are under the assumption that glasses are somehow uncool, which can make them very resistant to the idea of wearing them. The best way to teach kids that they’re still the same person with or without glasses is by explaining exactly what their specs do. A little bit of information about being long or short-sighted can help them to understand that glasses simply help them to see clearly. If this approach isn’t working, draw your child’s attention to people they look up to who also wear glasses. These might be children in their school, family members, or popular cartoon characters. Children love relating to others and might be excited to wear glasses just like yours.

Getting your child to wear glasses can feel like a losing battle at times, but your little one will come around eventually as long as you’re patient and supportive.